Den Mörka Kristallen;The Dark Crystal 1982 Movie.

The Dark Crystal is a 1982 puppet-animated dark fantasy film directed by Jim Henson and Frank Oz. It stars the voices of Stephen Garlick, Lisa Maxwell, Billie Whitelaw, Percy Edwards, and Barry Dennen. The film was produced by ITC Entertainment and The Jim Henson Company and distributed by Universal Pictures. The plot revolves around Jen, a Gelfling on a quest to restore balance to the world of Thra and overthrow the ruling Skeksis by restoring a powerful broken Crystal. It was marketed as a family film, but was notably darker than the creators’ previous material.The animatronics used in the film were considered groundbreaking for its time, with most creatures, like the Gelflings, requiring around four puppeteers to achieve full manipulation. The primary concept artist was fantasy illustrator Brian Froud, famous for his distinctive fairy and dwarf designs. Froud also collaborated with Henson for his next project, the1986 film Labyrinth. The Dark Crystal was produced by Gary Kurtz, while the screenplay was written by David Odell, with whom Henson previously worked as a staff writer for The Muppet Show. The film score was composed by Trevor Jones. The film received mixed reviews from mainstream critics; while being criticized for its darker, more dramatic tone in contrast to Henson’s previous works, it was praised for its narrative, aesthetic, and has since garnered a cult following. 

A prequel television series, The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance, premiered on Netflix in 2019.

Plot- A millennium ago on the planet Thra, two new races appeared when a shard was shattered from the Crystal of Truth: the malevolent Skeksis whose continued corruption of the Crystal to extend their lives ravaged Thra, and the gentle urRu, more commonly known as the Mystics, who made their home in the Valley of Stones to await for their destiny. The leader of the urRu, the Master UrSu, raised a young Gelfling named Jen whose clan were slaughtered by the Skeksis. As the Great Conjunction of Thra’s three suns draws near, a dying UrSu instructs Jen to fulfill a prophecy to heal the Crystal by first retrieving the Shard from Aughra. As UrSu passes, the Skeksis’ Emperor, SkekSo, also dies, leaving the position for the leader vacant. The Skeksis Chamberlain, skekSil, and the General, skekUng, challenge each other to a duel of succession, which results in skekUng defeating skeksil in a “Trial by Stone”. SkekSil is stripped of his robes and exiled, while skekUng is proclaimed the Skeksis’ new emperor. When the Skeksis learn of Jen’s existence, they send their army of giant crab-like Garthim to capture him, with skekSil following. Jen meets Aughra  and enters her orrery, which she uses to predict the motions of the heavens as she explains about the Conjunction before having Jen select the Shard from a box full of shards. Aughra was about to explain Jen’s mission before the Garthim arrive and destroy the orrery, taking Aughra prisoner as Jen flees. Hearing the call of the Crystal, the urRu leave their valley to travel to the Skeksis’ Castle. On his journey through the swamp, Jen meets Kira, another surviving Gelfling who can communicate with animals. The two learn more about each other when they accidentally “dreamfast”, seeing into each other’s memories. They stay for a night with the Podlings who raised Kira, only for them and Kira’s pet Fizzgig to flee when the Garthim raid the village. They are nearly caught by one of the Garthim, but skekSil intervenes by stalling it in its tracks, effectively keeping the Garthim from pursuing them. Jen and Kira discover a ruined Gelfling city with ancient writing describing a prophecy: “When single shines the triple sun, what was sundered and undone shall be whole, the two made one by Gelfling hand or else by none.” They are interrupted by skekSil, revealing the prophecy was the reason for the Gelfling genocide while trying to trick them into coming with him to the castle under false pretenses. But the Gelflings run off and reach the Castle of the Crystal on Landstriders, intercepting the Garthim that attacked Kira’s village. While trying to free the captured Podlings, Kira, Jen, and Fizzgig descend to the bottom of the Castle’s dry moat and use a lower-level entrance to gain access. But they are intercepted by skekSil, who once again attempts to convince the Gelflings to come with him, even attempting to drag them there when they refuse him further. Jen stabs skekSil’s hand with the crystal shard in defiance, and skekSil, in a fit of rage, buries Jen in a cave-in and takes Kira to the Skeksis. skekSil is reinstated as Chamberlain while giving Kira to the Skeksis’ Scientist, skekTek, to be drained of her life essence for skekUng to drink so that he can regain his youth. Aughra, imprisoned in the Scientist’s laboratory, tells Kira to call for help from the captive animals; they break free in response and free Kira while causing skekTek to fall down the crystal shaft to his death. The very moment of skekTek’s death his urRu counterpart, urTih, vanishes in a burst of flame. Aughra frees herself soon after Kira left and before Jen arrived. The three suns begin to align as the Gelflings reunite at the Crystal Chamber as the Skeksis gather for the ritual that will grant them immortality. Jen leaps onto the Dark Crystal but drops the shard, with Kira taking it after Fizzgig is knocked down the crystal shaft by skekUng (he is saved by Aughra shortly after). Kira throws the Shard back to Jen as she is fatally stabbed from behind by skekZok, the Skeksis’ Ritual-Master, and an enraged Jen inserts the Shard into the Crystal, fulfilling the prophecy. The Garthim disintegrate and the Podling slaves regain their essence while the dark stone covering the Castle crumbles away to reveal a crystalline structure. The urRu arrive and use the Crystal to merge themselves and the Skeksis into the beings they once were: the tall, glowing, and angelic urSkeks. The urSkeks’ leader explains to Jen they had mistakenly shattered the Crystal long ago, splitting them into two races and decimating Thra, Jen’s actions have restored them. The urSkeks revive Kira in gratitude for her sacrifice and Jen’s courage, and then ascend to a higher level of existence, leaving the Crystal to the Gelflings on the now-rejuvenated Thra.

Peter Pan 2003 Movie

Peter Pan ( 2003 film ) Peter Pan is a 2003 American fantasy adventure film directed by P.J. Hogan and written by Hogan and Michael Goldenberg. The screenplay is based on the 1904 play and 1911 novel Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up by J.M. Barrie. Jason Isaacs plays the dual roles of Captain Hook and George Darling, Olivia Williams plays Mrs. Darling, while Jeremy Sumpter plays Peter Pan, Rachel Hurd-Wood plays Wendy Darling, and Ludivine Sagnier plays Tinker Bell. Lynn Redgrave plays a supporting role as Aunt Millicent, a new character created for the film. After completing the script, Hogan and Goldenberg were given approval by Great Ormond Street Hospital, who held the rights to Barrie’s story. Principal photography took place in Australia at Village Roadshow Studios on the Gold Coast, Queensland from September 2002 to May 2003. Peter Pan premiered at the Empire in Leicester Square, London on 9 December and was theatrically released by Universal Pictures, Columbia Pictures, and Revolution Studios in the United Kingdom on 24 December 2003 and in the United States on 25 December 2003. The film received positive reviews from critics but grossed $122 million worldwide. With an estimated budget of $130.6 million (not including marketing costs), the film was a box office bomb resulting in a $70–95 million loss.

Plot- In 1904, in the nursery of the Darling household located in London, Wendy Darling tells stories of Peter Pan to her younger brothers John and Michael before their Aunt Millicent’s arrival. Judging Wendy to be an “almost” full- grown woman, Aunt Millicent advises Mr. and Mrs. Darling that Wendy should be given her own bedroom. At school, Wendy is caught by her teacher, daydreaming with a drawing she made after supposedly seeing Peter in the night. The school sends a letter about this to Wendy’s father at the bank. In an attempt to stop the messenger boy from delivering the letter with the help of the family’s nurse dog Nana, Wendy embarrasses her father in front of his superiors. As punishment, Mr. Darling chains Nana outside and declares that is time for Wendy to grow up and have a room of her own. Peter visits the nursery looking for his shadow, which Nana had bitten off during his previous visit. He introduces himself to Wendy, who sews his shadow back on. Peter invites her and her brothers to Neverland where Wendy can tell stories to his gang of Lost Boys. They agree and are taught to fly using Tinker Bell’s fairy dust. Nana breaks free from her chain and leads Mr. and Mrs. Darling back home from a party, but they arrive too late to stop the children flying away. Captain Hook and his crew are alerted to Peter’s return and fire their cannons, knocking Wendy far away and causing Michael and John to fall towards the island. Jealous of Wendy’s presence, Tinker Bell tricks the Lost Boys into shooting Wendy with arrows as she is falling from the sky. To their relief, Wendy survives as the arrow hits her acorn necklace. However Peter banishes Tinker Bell and ends their friendship. Wendy awakens and agrees to be the Lost Boys’ mother. They lead her to their hideout, but realize her brothers are missing. Michael and John encounter the Native American princess Tiger Lily and all three are then captured by Hook and his crew, and taken to the Black Castle. Peter and Hook engage in a duel, but it is stopped when the ticking crocodile arrives and tries to eat Hook, allowing the children to all escape. After a celebration at the Native American camp, Peter shows Wendy the fairies’ home and the two share a dance. Hook spies on the two and charms Tinker Bell, still hurt over her banishment. Peter becomes upset with Wendy after she tries to get him to express his feelings. He tells her to leave, refusing to believe that he can ever love and grow up. Tinker Bell leads Hook’s men to Wendy’s makeshift “house” and they carry Wendy to his ship. There, he tries to entice her to become a pirate, but sends a spy to follow her to the Lost Boys’ underground hideout afterwards. Wendy persuades her brothers to return home and are joined by the Lost Boys. Later, she leaves an upset Peter a cup of “medicine”. Wendy exits the hideout only to be ambushed and captured by Hook’ s crew. Hook enters the hideout and poisons Peter’s medicine. However, Tinker Bell intervenes, drinking the poison instead, and succumbs to it. Peter asserts his belief in fairies, which reaches out to residents of London, bringing Tinker Bell back to life. Peter and Tinker Bell save Wendy and the boys from walking the plank by the pirates and a battle soon breaks out. Hook uses fairy dust to fight Peter in a duel while flying and taunts him about Wendy abandoning him and forgetting all about him when she grows up. Weakened by those thoughts and unable to fight, Peter Pan is incapacitated. A kiss from Wendy revives Peter and he finally defeats Hook, who falls into the jaws of the crocodile. With the ship covered in fairy dust, Peter flies Wendy and the boys back to London. Mr. and Mrs. Darling are overjoyed at the return of their children, and adopt the Lost Boys. Slightly, who got lost on the way to London and arrives at the house too late, is adopted by Aunt Millicent. Peter promises never to forget Wendy and to return some day before heading back to Neverland with Tinker Bell. Wendy, as the adult narrator, claims she never saw Peter again, but she continues to tell his story to her own children and grandchildren so that his legacy will last forever.

Cast!

  • Jason Isaacs as Captain Hook: the captain of the Jolly Roger and Peter’s archenemy: Peter cut off Hook’s hand and fed it to a crocodile which has followed him ever since.
    • Following the stage tradition, Isaacs also portrays George Darling, the Darlings’ father.
  • Jeremy Sumpter as Peter Pan: a young boy who does not want to grow up. Unlike other versions, Peter’s feelings and even his mere presence affect various aspects of the weather.
  • Rachel Hurd-Wood as Wendy Darling: the eldest child of the Darling family and a surrogate mother to the Lost Boys and her younger brothers, John and Michael.
    • Saffron Burrows plays the adult Wendy, who narrates the film. Burrows appears in the deleted epilogue.
  • Lynn Redgrave as Aunt Millicent: the maternal aunt of the three Darling children. Aunt Millicent is an original character created for the film.
  • Richard Briers as Mr. Smee: Hook’s humorous first-mate.
  • Olivia Williams as Mrs. Mary Darling: the matriarch of the Darling family.
  • Harry Newell as John Darling: the middle child of the Darling family.
  • Freddie Popplewell as Michael Darling: the youngest child of the Darling family.
  • Ludivine Sagnier as Tinker Bell: Peter’s fairy companion who is jealous of Wendy.
  • Rebel as Nana: the dog nurse of the Darling family.
  • Carsen Gray as Tiger Lily: the daughter of a Native American chief.
  • Kerry Walker as Miss Fulsom: a strict schoolteacher.
  • Mathew Waters as the Messenger Boy.
  • The Lost Boys:
    • Theodore Chester as Slightly
    • Rupert Simonian as Tootles
    • George MacKay as Curly
    • Harry Eden as Nibs
    • Patrick Gooch and Lachlan Gooch as twins.
  • The Pirate Crew:
    • Alan Cinis as Skylights
    • Frank Whitten as Starkey
    • Bruce Spence as Cookson
    • Daniel Wyllie as Alf Mason
    • Brian Carbee as Albino
    • Don Battee as Giant Pirate
    • Frank Gallacher as Alsation Fogarty
    • Septimus Caton as Noodler
    • Jacob Tomuri as Bill Jukes
    • Venant Wong as Quang Lee
    • Phil Meacham as Bollard
    • Darren Mitchell as Mullins
    • Michael Roughan as Cecco

The film is dedicated to Dodi Al-Fayed, who was executive producer of the 1991 film Hook. Al-Fayed planned to produce a live action version of Peter Pan, and shared his ideas with Princess Diana (who was President of Great Ormond St Hospital), who said she “could not wait to see the production once it was underway.” Al-Fayed’s father, Mohammed Al-Fayed, co-produced the 2003 adaptation of the tale after his son died in the car crash which also killed Princess Diana. Finding Neverland, a film about J. M. Barrie and the creation of Peter Pan, was originally scheduled to be released in 2003, but the producers of this film – who held the screen rights to the story – refused permission for that film to use scenes from the play unless its release was delayed until the following year.

Contrary to the traditional stage casting, the film featured a young boy in the title role. Since the first stage production of the story, the title role has usually been played by a woman, a tradition followed in the first film adaptation. Two subsequent animated adaptations have featured a male voice actor as Peter Pan, and a Soviet live-action film adaptation for television cast a boy to play the role. This film was the first live-action theatrical release with a boy playing the part. The casting of a single actor to play both George Darling and Captain Hook follows a tradition also begun in the first staging of the play.

Brie Larson originally auditioned for Wendy Darling.

Principal photography began on 17 September 2002 and concluded on 5 May 2003, taking place entirely inside sound stages on Australia’s Gold Coast, Queensland. According to Fisher, the decision to shoot in Australia was based on the low value of the Australian dollar at that time. Hogan had originally planned on filming in a variety of locations such as Tahiti, New Zealand, and London but abandoned this idea after scouting some of the locations. Filming on sound stages did help “retain some of the theatricality of the original play”, something which Hogan thought was important.

The visual effects in the film are a mixture of practical and digital. The fairies that appear in the film are actors composited into the film with some digital enhancements. According to actor Jason Isaacs, the filmmakers were impressed with actress Ludivine Sagnier’s performance and decided to abandon their plans to make Tinker Bell entirely computer animated. The film also features a large, computer-generated crocodile. Another character, an animatronic parrot, appears in some scenes on the pirate ship. A complex harness was built to send the live-action actors rotating and gliding through the air for the flight sequences. They were then composited into the shots of London and Neverland, although they are sometimes replaced with computer-generated figures. One other aspect of bringing the story to life was the complex sword-fighting sequences, for which the actors were trained. Sumpter said that, “I had to train for five months before the shoot. I had to do harness training to learn how to fly and learn how to swordfight,” and that, “I got stabbed a couple of times with a sword.” Hogan says that the flying scenes were very difficult to accomplish, but that, “it was tougher on the kids than it was for me. They were up there on the harness 12′ off the ground, having to make it look like flying is easy and fun.” Sumpter grew several inches over the course of the film’s production, requiring staging tricks to retain Hook’s height advantage over Peter in face-to-face scenes late in the process. Hollywood-based producer Lucy Fisher also said that, “The window he flies out of had to be enlarged twice.”

This film was released in theatres on 18 December 2003 in Australia, on 24 December 2003 in the United Kingdom and on 25 December 2003 in the United States. The Film was distributed by Universal Pictures in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, France, & South Africa, and by Columbia Pictures in the rest of the world. While Universal distributed the Film Theatrically in France, the Home Video Rights are handled by Sony there.

For the promotion of the film, the original novel of Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie was re-released displaying the film’s promotional material. A video game based on the film was released for Game Boy Advance on 4 November 2003, receiving mixed reviews from critics.

Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a score of 76% based on 144 reviews, and an average rating of 6.8/10. The website’s critical consensus reads, “Solid if far from definitive, this version of Peter Pan is visually impressive, psychologically complex and faithful to its original source.” On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 64 out of 100, based on 33 critics, indicating “generally favorable reviews”.

Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film three and a half out of four stars. MovieGuide has also favourably reviewed the film, calling it “a wonderfully crafted, morally uplifting movie that intentionally emphasizes the fantasy elements of the story both in dialogue and design of the film.”

Peter Pan earned $48,462,608 at the box office in the United States and another $73.5 million outside the US, which brings the worldwide total to nearly $122 million. The film’s failure was partly due to its competition from the highly anticipated The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King released the week before, and Cheaper by the Dozen, which opened on the same day.

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2003 Jeremy Sumpter Best Performance by a Younger Actor Won
Best Fantasy Film Nominated
Rachel Hurd-Wood Best Performance by a Younger Actor Nominated
Janet Patterson Best Costumes Nominated

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2003 Peter Pan Best Family Film – Live Action Nominated

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2003 Rachel Hurd-Wood Best Youth in Film Nominated

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2003 Peter Pan Best Live Action Family Film Nominated
Jeremy Sumpter Best Performance by a Youth in a Lead or Supporting Role – Male Nominated

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2003 Yusei UesugiGiles Hancock Outstanding Matte Painting in a Motion Picture Nominated
Ludivine Sagnier Outstanding Performance by a Male or Female Actor in an Effects Film Nominated

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2004 Jeremy Sumpter Best Performance in a Feature Film – Leading Young Actor Won
Peter Pan Best Family Feature Film – Drama Won
Rachel Hurd-Wood Best Performance in a Feature Film – Leading Young Actress Nominated
Harry Newell Best Performance in a Feature Film – Supporting Young Actor Nominated
Carsen Gray Best Performance in a Feature Film – Supporting Young Actress Nominated

 

Jag älskar den filmen för den är magisk och äventyr sagor tror på älvorna. Jag ger Peter Pan movie 2003 190 poäng.

Peter Pan
Peter Pan 2003 film.jpg

International theatrical release poster
Directed by P. J. Hogan
Produced by
  • Lucy Fisher
  • Douglas Wick
  • Patrick McCormick
Screenplay by
  • P. J. Hogan
  • Michael Goldenberg
Based on Peter and Wendy
by J. M. Barrie
Starring
  • Jason Isaacs
  • Jeremy Sumpter
  • Rachel Hurd-Wood
  • Richard Briers
  • Olivia Williams
  • Lynn Redgrave
  • Ludivine Sagnier
  • Geoffrey Palmer
Music by James Newton Howard
Cinematography Donald McAlpine
Edited by
  • Garth Craven
  • Michael Kahn
Production
companies
  • Universal Pictures
  • Columbia Pictures
  • Revolution Studios
  • Red Wagon Entertainment
  • Allied Stars Ltd
Distributed by
  • Universal Pictures (English-Speaking Territories, France & South Africa)
  • Sony Pictures Releasing(International)
Release date
  • 18 December 2003(Australia)
  • 24 December 2003(United Kingdom)
  • 25 December 2003(United States)
Running time
113 minutes
Countries
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Australia
Language English
Budget $130 million
Box office $122 million